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RESOURCE LIBRARY
Material that has helped inform my understanding of my Asian American identity, in some way or other.
    Non-Fiction
    Articles
    Fiction
    Poetry
    Films
    Music
    Actors & Comedians
    Magazines & News Sources
    Art Archives
    
Digital Curators
    Fashion
    Collectives & Orgs

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WHAT???
ARTIST ARCHIVE

 
 

Please email me at hardlyunamerican@gmail.com
with questions, recommendations for the archive or library, suggestions for collaboration, or other thoughts.

 

DIGITAL CURATORS…

Fuck Yeah South Asia

WHAT IS THIS? A Tumblr run by 12 people of assorted  backgrounds and interests who post daily tidbits related to Indian, Pakistani, Afghanistani, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Bhutanese, and Maldivian culture.

WHY IS IT INCLUDED HERE? At the time of writing this, the first couple pages of posts from this blog include a description of a traditional form of Indian theater, an excerpt from Zayn’s book, a dreamy photo of a Balochi couple, an oil painting by a famous Pakistani artist, a tweeted conversation about a hot chai wala, and a mashup of government leaders across the world Photoshopped over images of global violence. I can always rely on FYSA to serve a perfect mix of political, cultural, artistic, and philosophical content that feels like it speaks to me personally while reminding me of a much larger global community that I’m a part of.

Rad Brown Dads

WHAT IS THIS? 28-year-old Ahmed Ali Akbar, born in Michigan to Pakistani parents, started a Tumblr dedicated to documenting his “dapper, retro Austin Powers-type” uncle in late 2013. The site eventually turned into a homage to stylish brown family members everywhere featuring vintage user-submitted photos.

WHY IS IT INCLUDED HERE? I’ve always thought about the fact that brown people aren’t included in imaginations of retro fashion and was always fascinated with photos of my family members and their friends listening to funk records, wearing bell-bottoms, hanging at the disco, etc. in photos from the 60s, 70s and 80s. I love how, in this interview, the founder articulates how he honors these kinds of photo as a way to take ownership of South Asian male identity and  see older generations of his family as whole, complex people.